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. we have the latest lessons in science and history from the gop. stay with us. >> we all like pbs. i mean, i have grand kids, they love big bird and burt ander ni and so forth, but we borrow money effectively from china to make sure our kids don't have to watch advertising on pbs. my view is it makes sense to stop borrowing many and let our kids get used to corn flakes. >> sesame street was brought today by the letter "g" for grouch. the capital one cash rewards card gives you a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more [ russian accent ] rubles. eh, eheh, eh, eh. [ brooklyn accent ] 50% more simoleons. [ western accent ] 50% more sawbucks. ♪ [ maine accent ] 50% more clams. it's a lobster, either way. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card. with a 50% annual cash bonus, it's the card for people who like more cash. [ italian accent ] 50% more dough! what's in your wallet? a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be diffi
's not an exact science, it's a snapshot in time. we will see if governor romney can sustain this bounce. the president got one ahead of his convention. it dissipated. romney got one out of the first debate. we'll see if it lasts. this science is not exact but it's pretty darned good. if you look back over time, it's pretty darned good. when you see the conspiracy theories you have to say it's the politics of the moment. every now and then you see a poll that you say well, that doesn't look right. i look at ours every time before we put them on the air and the guys who do it for us do it just right. >> go ahead, gloria. >> anderson, i also think it actually kind of affects the campaign in its own way because as the old saying goes, nothing sticks to you like success so when you have a candidate like mitt romney who has been down, maybe some of his voters are less enthusiastic because they think oh, he might not win. suddenly, he's got the wind at his back. suddenly they're thinking gosh, maybe this guy can win, maybe i ought to turn out and vote. then his base might become more enthusias
. bush administration. he's now a professor of political science and public policy at duke university. we thank you both for being with us. peter feaver, to you first. we heard governor romney today criticize the president broadly for not rejecting strongly enough america's influence in the world. yet when it came to specifics, we didn't hear many details. so let me just ask you about a couple of different places in the world. what about when it comes to iran. what exactly governor romney be doing differently right now? >> well, this is the criticism that the obama campaign has leveled at the romney campaign for not being detailed and specific enough. when it comes to iran, the president hasn't laid out a red line that he said clearly he would enforce. when asked to be precise about what it means for iran not to possess a nuclear weapon, the articulation of the red line, he's been vague and says he doesn't want to parse it further. i think there's a certain element of ambiguity about where you would draw the line precisely so as to avoid being trapped by it. but the other point to make is
oh, we're coming to get you. this dude is on the committee of science and technology. as would say he's from the tech-mology committee. and you know who else is on that committee? todd akin. all these guys from congress, i got t this is a good one. this is when lucifer burned the dinosaur bones. let's put the dumbest guys on the science and technology committee. if you think that's bad we're just warming up. a book with letters to the edit editor. the constitution of slavery to the black race has long believed to be an abomination upon its people. may actually have been a blessing in disguise. the blacks who could endure those conditions and circumstances would some day be rewarded with citizenship in the greatest nation ever established upon the face of the earth. oh, i don't know why i didn't see it that way? it's a blessing in disguise. why don't you be my slave and you do all my work. if you don't i'll whip you. does that sound like a blessing in disguise? and how hot is your wife? i might want to have sex with her. and what about your daughters. should have i sex with them before
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
treatment. our report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: for the first time ever, an experimental drug is showing great promise of slowing the alzheimer's disease. >> this is the first time we are seeing a slowing of the cognitive decline in patients with alzheimer's disease in this type of drug treatment. >> reporter: at first, the experimental drug seemed to fail as has every experimental drug to date. but when the manufacturer looked at it more closely, it found those with more mild disease had a less memory loss than those with the placebo, the 71-year-old retired expert still functions well. >> there are things that take a lot longer than they used to because i keep forgetting the order in which things have to be done. >> reporter: the results presented today combined studies with a total of 2,000 patients in the last two months. most scientists say it wouldn't be enough to reach the fda approval. but further studies show that it could help people with early alzheimer's disease. the drug is certainly not the cure that everybody wants, but for al krieger
. a report from our chief science correspondent robert bazell. >> reporter: about a million people receive steroid shots in the spine for back pain every year. several hundred patients are now receiving phone calls like this one -- >> this is cindy checking on our patients that had epidural steroid injections. need to know if everything's okay. >> reporter: health officials are now investigating 26 cases of severe meningitis in five states including four deaths. officials are trying to track down hundreds of other people in 23 states who got the injections and might be at risk. nbc news has learned health officials believe the outbreak originated at the new england compounding center near boston. the company is recalling hundreds of doses of a steroid compound it made for those lumbar injections believed to be contaminated with a fungus. >> one of the striking early features of this outbreak -- remember, we're still gathering data -- is that many of these patients are certainly middle-aged, they have back problems, but they're otherwise pretty healthy. >> reporter: a company like the new e
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
. each polling sort of public polling has their own art and science to likely voting and it is pretty much an art as it is a science a. lot of people had the art wrong going into the late primaries. that's why you saw early polls in the primaries being way off because you're hilikely voter didn't look like a electorate turned out. we had 11% of the general electorate in '08, so the screen was completely off. typically, you're going to undersample minorities and all these polls. that said, a big difference between a registered voter and likely voter, it's someone who says they're likely to vote high on their propensity up front on the phone call say they're going to vote and or they have some past performance in their background where they voted in one of the two or two of the three general elections. there's an art to this. on this point, i don't play the polling game back and forth, but a seven-point swing in party identification i think goes a long way to explain this. i know this is a story that the media wants to drive, but at the same time, you have a political out with a poll th
. and a lot of bad news coming out of research by the australian institute of marine sciences that as you pointed out half of the coral in the great barrier reef has declined largely due to both tropical storms, a crown of thorns starfish that feeds on the coral up to 40% declined just from the starfish alone and of course climate change and coral bleaching. >> so storms, starfish, climate change. what can we do to stop the coral loss? >> well, this is some scary news. this is much more than anyone expected. but there is a little bit of a silver lining. we believe the crown of thorns starfish in their larva stages grow faster because of runoff and fertilizer off the coast of australia. so scientists are calling for vehicler controls on that runoff going into the reef which may help to reduce the population of the crown of thorns starfish and hopefully relieve some of the pressure. they believe up to 42% of the decline of the great barrier reef has been caused by extreme outbreaks of these crown of thorns starfish. so hopefully reducing runoff can have a positive impact and allow the reef
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "early start." an american astronaut about to hitch a ride with the russians up to the international space station. later this month, nasa's kevin ford will join two russian astronauts aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft that will blast them into orbit for a five-month stay. ford will join the station's current team and take over as expedition commander. this will mark for the second space flight and his first aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft. kevin ford is joining us live now from the cosmonaut training center in star city, russia, where he and his crewmates have been preparing for the mission. thank you for being with us. you will be at that time iss from the end of the month until march of next year. can you tell us what you will be doing while you are there? >> well, i can't tell you exactly what we will be doing but i can tell you what we plan to do. so we -- we hope to carry out a lot of science. we had a lot of trainin
from poll to poll. there's no science to this. polls will differ on that number, depending on what they're finding in the field and it will drive you crazy to dig deep into the poll and say this one has more democrats, this one has more republicans. look at the trends over time. we have two polls. we want ten polls off this debate, we want to know where the race really is. all we have is gallup and pew. it's showing a huge bump up for romney. all these polls have a house effect. over time they all show in the course of 2012 a little bit of an advantage for one candidate or another. rasmussen very often shows a pro-republican house effect. pew has very often shown a pro-obama effect. it makes this huge romney lead even more surprising. wait for a week's worth of polls and we'll see where the race stands. as you point out, this is the best news romney has had since before his convention. >> does this couldn't as an october surprise. >> usually october surprises is some outside event that changes the election or something -- some conspiracy that a campaign polls at the last second to advan
it in the last few days. the conventional wisdom among the political science crowd is you don't have much variance between where the national horse race stands and where the race stands in the battleground states. if it moves nationally, it moves the same direction in the swing states. we see in this race closer polls nationally where obama will only be ahead by two points or whatever it is, and then you look at ohio and virginia and you see four or five, six, seven point margins. is there any imbalance between the two, and do you have any explanation for it? >> we don't have very many state polls back yet. the initial wave of state polls showed romney doing pretty well in the battleground states. in the rasmussen polls over the last two days, obama is doing better. that's consistent with the trend i talked about earlier. the question is whether obama gets an outsized bounce in states like ohio, nevada and iowa where he was doing better than nationally. if you look at all of the national polls conducted since the first debate, what you see is about a three point gain for romney. if that h
to finance the transcontinental railroad, let's start the national academy of sciences, let's start land grant colleges, because we want to give these gateways of opportunity for all americans, because if all americans are getting opportunity, were all one of the better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom, but enhances it. what i have tried to do as president is to apply those same principles. and when it comes to education, what i've said is we've got to reform schools that are not working. we something called race to the top. we've said, we will give you more money if you initiate reforms. as a consequence, had 46 states around the country have made a real difference. but what i've also said is, let's hire another 100,000 math and science teachers to make sure we maintain our technological lead and our people are skilled and able to succeed. and hard-pressed states right now cannot all do that. in fact, we've seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years, and governor romney doesn't think any more teachers. i do, because i think that is the kind
'm in the u.s. science, i will fight efforts to privatize social security till my last breath. it would have been a disaster. let's talk about medicare. george suggests i want to take money out of the medicare program. the 700 billion he refers to was ending overpamess to insurance companies so we -- overpayments to insurance companies so we could expand benefits to seniors in the medicare program. prescription drug benefit preventive care. george's plan repealing the affordable care act would take the benefits back from seniors and give them back to insurance companies. he would give back to insurance companies the right to turn people down for pre-existing conditions. he would give back to insurance companies the right to charge women differential premiums than men. we're not going to solve our healthcare problems or medicare problems by putting insurance companies back in control. let's end the sweetheart deal waifs negotiated with pharmaceutical companies and negotiate for pricing. we'll save $250 billion over ten years of medicare. >> let's go a question by bill miller for mr. kaine. >>
and science teachers. to train 2 million additional workers at community colleges. to cut our oil imports and invest in clean energy jobs. the president has a plan to move aggressively toward creating more jobs and we need to continue moving in that direction. we can't afford to go back to the same failed economic policies of the past that mitt romney is promoting. >> melanie roussel, thank you, for joining me this morning. >> thank you for having me, randi. >>> soledad o'brien has a special documentar"latino in america courting their vote" that airs tomorrow night at 8:00 p.m. eastern. we'll give you a sneak peek a little bit later this morning. >>> the entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well in tennessee. two teenage brothers are behind this corn maze depicting president obama and mitt romney on their parents' farm. kind of tough to see there on the screen. there you go with a closer look. $8 a pop, all viz teres a s ate welcome. those guys did a pretty good job there. >>> some hospitals are giving employees the option. get a flu shot or get fired. now, some workers are saying the mand
media spin with science and public safety. as for the lame names, considering the weather channel is partially owned by nbc maybe they should look within t
and science teacher and create more spots in the community colleges so people can get trained and i want to make sure and keep tuitition low for our young people. >> and i want to make sure everybody's christmas stocking is fill would with everything they wanted. one little problem about what he's saying not been race to the top it is not a bad program and i commend arnie duncan for rewarding poem who do well. that is different than it is economy where we punish people for doing well. i wish the president's economic policies are based on that premise and clearly they are not he said we need a 100,000 new teacher classroom is it the responsibility of the federal government to hire teacher a local school board? your schools are your responsibility in your community and state. there is nothing in the federal constitution that said the federal government ought to hire teachers for you. if you think you need more teachers hire them in your local level and let your school board decide who they are and what they teach. it was not just what the cand date said that made the difference body langua
romney walked over him. >> it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself but, look, i think part of that was because, as i've said earlier, we met a new mitt romney. we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which is his tax cut. i don't have a tax cut that's 4.8 trillion or $5 trillion. i'm not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a medicare voucher program. i love teachers. we need more of them. don't believe me. speaker gingrich was pretty elegant in the primaries saying, look, mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> and here's ""the new yorker's" take on the debate. it shows mitt romney debating an empty chair. >>> president obama continues be on his fundraising swing through california looking to capitalize on friday's good economic news. september unemployment rate released on friday dipped to 7.8%, the lowest of his presidency. and new fundraising numbers show the obama campaign is coming off its best month of the year raising $1
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lists. i programs and services for autism speaks, the world's leading autism science and advocacy organization. thank you so much for joining us inside "the war room." >> thank you for having me. >> jennifer: i'm so pleased you are here to provide a human perspective on what these kids might mean. why before we get to that is why is this wave of autism happening? >> fortunately, we don't know. the increase in autism over the last 20 years is tenfold and 50% of it can be explained through better diagnosis, and awareness, but the other 50% we don't really know what is behind that increase. >> jennifer: well obviously there is a huge concern on the part of would be parents and existing parents about how a child ends up being autistic. i want to play a public service announcement. let's watch that. >> i have autism. >> i have autism. >> i have autism. >> and i want you to see me as an individual. >> and not a label. >> i want autism to be an avoidable topic for our lawmakers running for office this fall. >> jennifer: so what has been the response? >> we are really t
on politics. >>science and republicans do not mix. >>now it's your turn at the only online forum with a direct line to eliot spitzer. >>join the debate now. 1cccm01724
. >> there's no doubt about it. you can see it. >> pelley:>> reporter: of course is a science to, this which ron explained and which i didn't understand. >> atmospheric nitrogen. >> reporter: tick tell you i've driven to toledo in thingss that weigh less than this pumpkin. we won't tell you what -- know what it weighs until it goes to another competition but 21,00 pounds isn't out of the question. >> now everyone's saying let's go for 2,500 pounds. >> reporter: when is this going to stop? i'm worried about them taking over the earth. >> there has to be a limit. there's a limit on everything, i think. >> reporter: let's hope. god forbid he ever gets his hands on a brussel sprout. steve hartman, "on the road", in green, rhode island. >> and that's the "cbs evening news" for tonight. for all of us at cbs news all around the world, i'm scott pelley. see you sunday on "60 minutes." >>> this is 9news now. >> some metro train passengers consider it a critical safety issue, but the transit agency says it is complying with the americans with disabilities act. those bumpy tiles are known as domes. pe
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 176 (some duplicates have been removed)

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